Genre-Blending As A Strength & Writing In Your Non-Native Language with Katya De Becerra

Today’s guest is Katya de Becarra, who was born in Russia, studied in California, lived in Peru, and then stayed in Australia long enough to become a local. She was going to be an Egyptologist when she grew up, but instead she earned a PhD in Anthropology and now works as a university lecturer and a researcher. Her debut What The Woods Keep was released in three countries in 2018. Katya joined me today to talk about blending genres in her debut title, and how she managed to find a publisher that believed it was a strength, rather than a marketing weakness, writing in your non-native language, and how Katya made the decision to write her novels in English.

Bethany C. Morrow: The Need For Inclusion In Publishing

Today’s guest is Bethany C. Morrow author of MEM releasing in May from Unnamed Press. Bethany graduated from the University of California, Santa Cruz with a BA in Sociology (but took notable detours in the Film and Theatre departments). Following undergrad, she studied Clinical Psychological Research at the University of Wales, in Great Britain before returning to North America to focus on her literary work. Bethany joins host Mindy McGinnis to talk about her query process, as well as writing in a post-election world as a black woman, and the concern that minority authors need to be looking for agents that want to represent them for a long-term career, not just as a response to a trend and whether or not white writers should attempt to write main characters of color, and the difference between that and being inclusive in your writing.

Mindee Arnett: Rejection Letters

Today’s guest is Mindee Arnett author of THE NIGHTMARE AFFAIR series, the Sci Fi titles AVALON and POLARIS as well as the upcoming fantasy ONYX & IVORY. Mindee joins host Mindy McGinnis to talk about rejection letters – both physical and by email – and realigning expectation with reality once you become published. Also covered: how being a mid-lister can be a benefit when it comes to genre jumping and how to know when you’re researching too much.